"Shoeless" Joe Jackson

The 1919 World Series featured baseball’s most infamous scandal. That Fall Classic pitted the heavily favored Chicago White Sox against the underdog Cincinnati Reds. Eager to make some extra money, some Sox took bribes from gamblers to throw the World Series. Eventually, the bribery was discovered and a national scandal erupted. Sox star outfielder "Shoeless" Joe Jackson’s name appeared prominently among those implicated as cheaters. By 1921, several White Sox, including Shoeless Joe, faced a criminal trial. A Chicago jury found them not guilty, but the baseball commissioner banned them from the sport forever. Follow as the Chicago History Museum uses Shoeless Joe's voice to tell his story.

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White Sox Chick Gandil is called out stealing second, Game 1 of World Series, Redland Field, Cincinnati, October 1, 1919 (SDN-061952)
The team wasn’t very hopeful at the beginning of Game 3 but our rooters didn’t give up on us. More than 34,000 people packed into Comiskey Park to see if we could turn the Series around. Our manager Kid Gleason put rookie, Dickie Kerr on the mound. Kerr shut out the Reds and lead us to a victory, surprising gamblers like Bill Burns. Supposedly, none of the players had been paid for the fix and wanted to send a message.  I’m not sure if the crooked players meant to win. Either way, though, the gamblers felt double crossed.  First baseman Chick Gandil, a leader of the whole operation, knew he’d have to produce some cash if he wanted to keep the rest of the Black Sox from jumpin’ ship on the whole scheme.

White Sox Chick Gandil is called out stealing second, Game 1 of World Series, Redland Field, Cincinnati, October 1, 1919 (SDN-061952)

The team wasn’t very hopeful at the beginning of Game 3 but our rooters didn’t give up on us. More than 34,000 people packed into Comiskey Park to see if we could turn the Series around. Our manager Kid Gleason put rookie, Dickie Kerr on the mound. Kerr shut out the Reds and lead us to a victory, surprising gamblers like Bill Burns. Supposedly, none of the players had been paid for the fix and wanted to send a message.  I’m not sure if the crooked players meant to win. Either way, though, the gamblers felt double crossed.  First baseman Chick Gandil, a leader of the whole operation, knew he’d have to produce some cash if he wanted to keep the rest of the Black Sox from jumpin’ ship on the whole scheme.